Vintage, Secondhand and Antique items are, by definition, not new. As such, there is an expectation that an item will have wear and tear, potential faults and may not have the same life expectancy as something new. They do not come with a warranty (unless stated).

However, the pleasure of owning a Vintage, Secondhand or Antique item is in the imperfections, the story, the life it has lived and now shares with you.

I do my absolute up-most to describe all faults with my items so that you, the buyer, can make an informed decision. A picture is worth a thousand words and I’m always happy to send more to help convey the current state of an item.

 

When am I (the buyer) entitled to a refund?

– Item is faulty (and it is a fault that you were not made aware of prior to purchasing the item).

Please be aware that Vintage, Secondhand and Antique items may have defects and faults which are commensurate with age – electrics may need replacing to meet modern standards, plastic may be brittle and break with use, metal may corrode easier, wood may discolour, fabric may change after wash. These are part and parcel of purchasing an item of age; care and consideration must be taken when purchasing such items. Age, price and condition are all factors considered under Australian Consumer Law.

– Item doesn’t match the sample or demo model.
– Item doesn’t match the description. If the item is so different from the description that you would not have bought it, you are entitled to a refund. Example – Item described as leather but was plastic.
– Item doesn’t do what the salesperson said it would do.
– Item doesn’t do what I asked for.

 

When am I not entitled to a refund?

– The store told you (or displayed a sign) about hidden defects before you bought it
– You examined the item before buying and didn’t find defects you should have noticed.
– You used the item in an ‘abnormal’ way.
– You have used the item for a very long time.
– You have simply changed your mind.

For more information, please see the helpful Australian Consumer Law fact sheet:

Consumer Guarantees Guide